Everyday interruptions at your medical practice can be a barrier to effective time management and can eventually become an obstacle to your success. Put your phone to work for you-Not against you. You control telephone interruptions, they don’t control you.

Tips for Success

Tip #1 Designate a specific time of day to accept calls and another time of day to reply to messages. Forward calls outside of these time periods to voice mail.

Tip #2 Record a custom greeting on your voicemail that identifies individuals who may be of further assistance to the caller and give specific instructions for leaving a message.

  • This will lessen any anxiety or worry on your end that you are missing an important call, and allow you to continue on in your workday with limited telephone interruptions.

Tip #3 Prepare for outgoing calls in advance. Group your outbound calls together, and be sure to have all of the necessary facts and information prepared prior to placing each call.

Tip #4 Call verbose people when they are least likely to talk for very long.

  • “Think smarter, An old military adage that may come in handy here is, not harder.” No one wants to receive a work call near or during lunch, or at the end of the work day. So, if you owe a telephone call to a verbose person, this may be your time to call.

Tip #5 Indicate up front that your time is limited. Leaving a professional and detailed message indicating your availability to receive calls is okay, and may assist in limiting telephone interruptions throughout your workday as well.

Tip #6 Know when to bring closure to a call is very important. Using appropriate closing statements such as, “Thank you for your time,” and “Call me if I can be of further assistance,” can bring a call quickly and professionally to an end.

*Remember-Always avoid social conversation if possible. This will prolong your telephone conversation and take time away from your workday.

“Don’t give up because things are hard, but work smarter, when you think of giving up.”